More than five participants


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Last updated 06 June 2017 14:53 by NZTecAdmin

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More than Five Participants

If there are more than five participants it is recommended to form smaller groups. Ideally each group consists of 3-5 people to encourage everyone to contribute to the conversations as well as to enable exchange of multiple ideas. With multiple groups, one of the following two situations will apply.

1.  Multiple groups are formed and only one questionnaire is to be completed.

  • In this situation each group completes the questionnaire.
  • The final 30 minutes of the session are used for each group to present their findings to the other groups.
  • While the groups are presenting, the facilitator writes the strengths and actions on a large sheet of paper or on a whiteboard or screen that is visible to all.
  • After all strengths and actions have been presented, the facilitator leads the discussion for the groups to decide on a single list of strengths and actions.
  • The summary of strengths and action plan are then completed. A template is found here.  
    Completion of the summary and strengths and of the action plan could also occur after the session. It is then important to agree during the session who will do this and by when.
  • Completed questionnaires, summary of strengths and action plan are all filed in an agreed place that is accessible to all.
  • It is agreed during the session who will initiate and oversee the implementation of the action plan.

‚Äč2.  Multiple groups are formed and multiple questionnaires are to be completed.

  • One option for this situation is to structure the activity in the same way as for multiple groups and one questionnaire. After completion of one or a few questionnaire(s) the groups present to each other as described under i) above and the facilitator leads the discussion for the groups to decide on a single list of strengths and actions.
  • However, if there are many questionnaires this may take up a lot of time. It is also recommended for a group to spend no more than 2.5 hours in total on completing the questionnaires. Additionally, the actions that are identified across the questionnaires are often related and a more holistic perspective can be obtained if all identified actions across all questionnaires are considered simultaneously. To achieve this, the following alternative approach is worth considering if there are four or more questionnaires to be completed.
  • The questionnaires are divided among the groups, with each group having to complete two to five questionnaires. The groups are formed such that group members have sufficient knowledge of the topics in the questionnaires that are given to their group. This not only helps with participant engagement, but it also ensures that, if evidence for the judgements exists, the group members are likely to know of it, and as such it helps avoid too many ‘I don’t know’s in the answers.
  • Each group then completes the questionnaires that they have been given.
  • Subsequently they are asked to write the strengths and critical actions that they have identified on a large sheet of paper (e.g. flip chart sheets or butcher paper). A separate paper is used for each questionnaire, and the title of the questionnaire is written at the top of the paper. This implies that if four questionnaires have been completed there will be four large sheets with strengths and actions. The sheets are hung on the wall, visible to everyone.
  • The final 1-1.5 hours are spent as follows.
  • Once all sheets are hung each group briefly presents their strengths and actions to the others who have an opportunity to ask questions and discuss. Changes are made to strengths and/or actions if needed.
  • The groups are then invited, with help from the facilitator, to group or combine the strengths where appropriate. Next the group identifies themes across the actions that enable for some of the actions to be combined.
  • During the discussion the facilitator can either add notes to the papers on the wall to indicate the outcomes of the discussion, or s/he writes the strengths and actions on a fresh screen, or a large sheet of paper or a whiteboard, such that this is visible to all.
  • For developing the concluding summary of strengths and the action plan, either of the following could be done.
    • Still during the session, the grouped or combined strengths and actions are distributed among the groups. Each group completes a summary of their assigned strengths and a plan for their assigned actions. A template is found here.
      After the session one person or a small group will combine the work of the groups into a single document.
    • One person or a small group takes all the findings from the session with them to create a summary of the strengths and an action plan. A template is found here.
    • It is important to agree during the session who will do the after-session work, by when, and how the outcomes will be communicated to everyone.
  • Completed questionnaires, summary of strengths and action plan are all filed in an agreed place that is accessible to all.
  • It is agreed during the session who will initiate and oversee the implementation of the action plan.

 

 

 

 

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